Mars in the desert by Jim Urquhart

Names of members of the past crew members on the doors to the crew bunks at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) outside Hanksville in the Utah desert Matt Cross, rover engineer of Crew 125 EuroMoonMars B mission, works on a rover at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) outside Hanksville in the Utah desert Hans van Ôt Woud, a mapping researcher and the health and safety officer of Crew 125 EuroMoonMars B mission, checks on plants grown at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) outside Hanksville in the Utah desert A vintage map of Mars hangs on the wall at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) outside Hanksville in the Utah desert Melissa Battler, a geologist and commander of Crew 125 EuroMoonMars B mission, studies collected geologic samples at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) outside Hanksville in the Utah desert Melissa Battler, a geologist and commander of Crew 125 EuroMoonMars B mission, talks to members of the crew about collecting geologic samples to be studied at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) outside Hanksville in the Utah desert Members of Crew 125 EuroMoonMars B mission, venture out in their simulated space suits to collect geologic samples to be studied at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) outside Hanksville in the Utah desert Members of Crew 125 EuroMoonMars B mission, venture out in their simulated space suits to collect geologic samples to be studied at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) outside Hanksville in the Utah desert Melissa Battler, left, a geologist and commander and Csilla Orgel, a geologist on Crew 125 EuroMoonMars B mission, climb a rock formation to collect geologic samples to be studied at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) outside Hanksville in the Utah d Members of Crew 125 EuroMoonMars B mission, venture out in their simulated space suits to collect geologic samples to be studied at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) outside Hanksville in the Utah desert Melissa Battler, a geologist and commander of Crew 125 EuroMoonMars B mission, collects geologic samples to be studied at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) outside Hanksville in the Utah desert Members of Crew 125 EuroMoonMars B mission, collect geologic samples to be studied at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) outside Hanksville in the Utah desert Csilla Orgel, a geologist of Crew 125 EuroMoonMars B mission, collects geologic samples to be studied at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) outside Hanksville in the Utah desert Hans van Ôt Woud, a mapping researcher and the health and safety officer of Crew 125 EuroMoonMars B mission, collects geologic samples to be studied at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) outside Hanksville in the Utah desert Volker Maiwald, executive officer and habitat engineer of Crew 125 EuroMoonMars B mission, walks among the rock formations while collecting geologic samples to be studied at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) outside Hanksville in the Utah desert Csilla Orgel, a geologist on Crew 125 EuroMoonMars B mission, makes her way back to the habitat in her simulated space suit at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) outside Hanksville in the Utah desert The Musk Observatory can been from the working and living quarters at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) outside Hanksville in the Utah desert Members of Crew 125 EuroMoonMars B mission, return after collecting geologic samples to be studied at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) outside Hanksville in the Utah desert Matt Cross, Rover engineer of Crew 125 EuroMoonMars B mission, works at his computer at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) outside Hanksville in the Utah desert

Photographer Jim Urquhart traveled into the Utah desert to document the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) where a crew of scientists work, study and live together in conditions designed to simulate being on Mars. The MDRS aims to investigate the feasibility of a human exploration to the red planet and uses the Utah desert’s Mars-like terrain to test working conditions and study geology. All outdoor exploration is done wearing spacesuits and carrying air supply packs and crews live together in a small communication base with limited amounts of electricity, food, oxygen and water. Everything needed to survive must be produced, fixed and replaced on site. Read Jim’s personal account here.