The Armory by Elizabeth Moran

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The Armory by Elizabeth Moran documents the ever-changing sets of the pornography company Kink.com. Private spaces are constructed for a public gaze and appear both familiar and strangely foreign. Devoid of people, the spaces allude to an activity, but leave the viewer to imagine the scene. Fantasy and desire are often the result of mass manufacturing. Studies illustrate the changing sexual trends in America due to the increase in pornography consumption via the internet. However, what is produced is a direct result of what is demanded. What is watched is recreated and repackaged as something new. Does pornography then act as a mirror, a simple reflection of our collective, illicit desires?

Kink.com was founded in 1997 by Peter Acworth while he was pursuing his PhD in finance at Columbia University. Today, Kink.com’s headquarters occupy the San Francisco Armory. Built by the United States National Guard in 1912, the Armory’s Drill Court became San Francisco’s primary sports venue for prizefights from the 1920s through 1940s. After falling into disrepair, the Armory was purchased by Kink.com in 2006 and is now one of the largest adult production studios in the world.